PHILIP POCOCK documentary datatectures ||| Index of Photographs || Cibachrome Painting | Allocations 49th Parallel Gallery New York
PHILIP
POCOCK

LOVE CANAL
ALLOCATIONS exhibition
William A. Ewing curator
49th Parallel Gallery
New York 1984.

Love Canal installation views:

Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982

Albany Museum Georgia

Leyendecker Tenerifa

Museum Ludwig

Piezo Electric New York

William Ewing, currently director, the Musée de l'Elysée, Lausanne, was at the time, 1984, Director of Exhibitions at the International Center of Photography in New York. He conceived of a show he titled Allocations and along with other Canadian artists including Michael Snow, George Legrady, I was invited todo an installation piece from my 'lightless' alchemical Cibachromes.

Working with rather toxic chemicals - this work was to be one of my last photochemical productions - I hinged upon the recent environmental scandal in the New York papers, where a chemical waste spill had poisoned and harmed children in a town with the unlikely name of Love Canal upstate New York.For this large work (in photographic terms) I took two 15 meter x 1 meter industrial rolls of Cibachrome material,exposed it all instantly to daylight, built a special sink and wearing an organic vapor mask, special clothing, in a room in my studio equipped with a jet exhaust fan changing the air every 3-4 minutes for this purpose, I bleached, oxidized, coaxed color of a toxic psychedelic nature fluidly from each roll. Motives emerged as starfish formed in crystallizing chemistry, I captured it, a siren, a seahorse,waves and currents were somehow just below the surface of the Cibachrome roll immersed in pools of milky and pungent liquids, and captured when the work was treated and dry. Installed, its height of 2 meters wrapped around the space, and around the visitors to my small room, about 20 square meters, in a work that marked an ultimatum or perhaps an end to photochemical processes in art, treating the emulsion and the photo dyes as canvas and pigment. It was as if photography in an emerging digital world, was taking the stage alongside painting. It did.