PHILIP POCOCK documentary datatectures ||| Index of Photographs || Cibachrome Painting | Piezo Electric Gallery New York
PHILIP
POCOCK

Cibachrome Painting
Piezo Electric Gallery
New York 1983-87.

Piezo Electric show
First Experiments 1982:

Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982
Piezo Electric show
Appropriations 1984:

Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1982 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1984
Piezo Electric show
Alchemical Painting/Photo Hybrids 1987:

Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987 Philip Pocock, Cibachrome Painting, Piezo Electric Gallery NYC 1987

Allocations New York

Albany Museum of Art Georgia

Leyendecker Tenerifa

Museum Ludwig

Having built a large archive of images concerning painting and urban spaces - OBVIOUS ILLUSION - I set myself on slowing down while fusing painting and photography more intimately. The obstacle - light. Moholy Nagy had predicted from Dessau 1929 that having removed the camera from the photographic process, someday light would be removed.
I purchased boxes of 30x40 in. as well as 15x1 m. rolls of Cibachrome material and in my studio I EXPOSED IT TO DAYLIGHT. Instead I worked in a way I could imagine alchemists prior to the Renaissance had worked, coaxing something extraordinary from matter through chemistry. Chloramin-T would dissolve the magenta Cibachrom dye, leaving green. I worked with chemicals and brushes using a subtractive process, remove yellow for blue, magenta for green, cyan for red. Photographic developers in various dilutions provided gray tones, and other chemicals and instruments came into play for various effects and color purposes.
Eventually I employed painted silkscreens through which liquid plastic was squeegied, being held to the Cibachrome material only by static electricity to the Cibachrom material, to act as a temporary 'raincoat' while I developed photographic images - usually of brick, walls and rubble from downtown New York. Removing the 'raincoat' easily, the same oxidizing chemicals, brushes and subtractive, alchemical process would integrate a painterliness into what are actual single-support, single-dye hybrids of painting and photography.

The Obvious Illusion lyrical documentary photography exhibition pre-envisioned this Cibachrome work. It had opened at the Cooper Union gallery, on Astor Place, the gateway to the East Village. This more process-oriented work was shown and handled by Piezo Electric Gallery, first a storefront on Clinton and Stanton Street belowE. Houston, then migrated north to East 6th Street, and then Avenue B and 10th St. Piezo Electric was one of the first wave of East Village galleries to open in New York in the early 80s, and its proprietors Doug Milford and Lisa McDonald made it a hub for the East Village scene, repesenting Keiko Bonk (His Masters Voice singer, then Congresswoman from Hawaii), Richard Hambleton of Shadow street art fame, and others. The gallery closed in 1987. The works at left are for the most part in private and corporate collections in New York and the USA. Sizes range from 20x24 inches, to 30x40 inches, up to 30x80 in and 120x40 in. and were priced between $800 - 2500.